Month: July 2021

#MakeArtMondays | Paper Wallet

These paper wallets are a fun way above all else, to facilitate children’s understanding of the concept of money. Considering what financial literacy looks like in our country, it’s never too early to start. With wallets, kids count and organize their dollar bills, save them until they’re ready to make their purchase.

*Parental Supervision Required

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Track: Hawaii — Scandinavianz [Audio Library Release] Music provided by Audio Library Plus Watch: https://youtu.be/j04RIIV-MXY Free Download / Stream: https://alplus.io/hawaii

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Advertisement

#TBT | NGW Guests

It was a pleasure to have had Senior Curator, O’Neil Lawrence alongside Trinidadian Artist, Curator & Writer Christopher Cozier, Jamaican Artist Cosmo Whyte and London Based Curator & Lecturer Paul Goodwin visit and view our Marcia Biggs exhibition at National Gallery West in 2017.

#TBT | The Inaugural Exhibition: Religion and Spirituality in Jamaican Art

Our inaugural National Gallery West exhibition, “Religion and Spirituality in Jamaican Art”, opened as part of the Centre’s official opening function on July 11 2014. Religion and Spirituality in Jamaican Art was an abridged version of the acclaimed Explorations II: Religion and Spirituality exhibition which was shown at the National Gallery of Jamaica in Kingston from December 22, 2013 to April 27, 2014.

Some of the art in this exhibition was intended as religious art by its makers and includes some of its main exponents – such as Kapo, Osmond Watson, Carl Abrahams and Everald Brown – but artists have also been drawn to the subjects of religion and spirituality from a more secular point of view, for instance as part of the search for iconic Jamaican subject matter. The exhibition also included examples of work that uses religious iconography as a metaphor to address other non-religious issues, whether personal or social. Given the hegemonic and counter-hegemonic roles of religions and spirituality in Jamaican history and life, it is indeed impossible to separate religious, spiritual and secular concerns and much of the art in this exhibition was deeply political, in that it questions and actively challenges racial hierarchies and power dynamics, including those that obtain in the dominant religions.

Other featured artists in this exhibition included Ebony G. Patterson, Edna Manley, Ralph Campbell, Albert Artwell and Eugene Hyde.

To read more, visit: https://nationalgallerywest.wordpress.com/2014/07/03/themes-in-religion-and-spirituality/

#MakeArtMondays | Emoji Mood Card

Mood cards are a fun way especially for your kids to express how they’re feeling if they don’t necessarily want to vocalize the way they’re feeling.

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Palm Shadows by Nekzlo https://soundcloud.com/nekzlo Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://theartistunion.com/tracks/41e433 Music promoted by: Good Vibes – No Copyright Vlog Music https://bit.ly/2YAg2XI

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

#TBT – A Conversation with Nile Saulter & Storm Saulter

National Gallery West was pleased to have hosted ‘A Conversation with Nile Saulter & Storm Saulter’ in January 2019 – an artist talk, moderated by Chief Curator, O’Neil Lawrence, that explored both Nile and Storm’s work that were featured in the esteemed exhibition, ‘I Shall Return Again’, as well as a discussion about their experiences as filmmakers. The exhibition also featured works by Monique Gilpin, Leasho Johnson and Cosmo Whyte.